A part or apart?

Friday, August 15th, 2014 - by Bella

Have a look: next to each other? Apart from one another? Inches on the left, centimeter on the right.

Necklace lengths
Source: Catalog Swiss Shop Duty Free, Summer 2014.

Pretty much apart. Although, the same belongs next to each other in one part. But the same is not the same here. Because it is for different nationalities. For the English and for the Germans. Therefore apart. Good job.

No information

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014 - by Bella

Once again at the airport. Where there’s lots of information.

Informationstafeln am Flughafen Zürich.

Or no information.

Informationstafeln am Flughafen Zürich: "no information".

Useless.

Three men

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014 - by Bella

A friend sent me this: From London. From the airport. It shows how long you have to wait. At security. Have a look.

How busy is security? London Heathrow, Terminal 5.
London Heathrow, Terminal 5.

North and South have the same length. But – how long are three men? Don’t know. Although you know more with it than without. Good. Even better with minutes.

Heading, go!

Monday, June 30th, 2014 - by Bella

The stock market in the Financial Times is funny as well. Thanks to the headings. It gets even more funny when there is no heading at all. Have a look. A DIY-chart: You have to think about it what it’s supposed to say. Probably, that Indian Equities rose by 20 % (= (24–20)/20)? Or, that Indian Equities lately rose by 10 % (= (24–22)/22)?

Quelle: Financial Times vom 16.05.2014.
Source: Financial Times, 2014–05–16.

Also funny: Heading below, than look for the 10 %.

Quelle: Financial Times vom 16.05.2014, Seite 1.
Source: Financial Times, 2014–05–16, page 1.

A legend within the chart would be great. With an arrow, for example. Funny: the arrow always points in the wrong direction. Because it’s not an arrow, it’s a sign.

Source: Financial Times, 2014-05-16, page 21.
Source: Financial Times, 2014–05–16, page 21.

Very funny as well: scale and superscribe it, so that plus 1.57 and minus 22.50 look alike. Especially funny: at times, change is relative, at other times, change is absolute – all in one newspaper. Although the development of prices are compared. This has to be done in a relative way.

Source: Financial Times, 2014-05-16.
Source: Financial Times, 2014–05–16.

Ash trash

Sunday, June 15th, 2014 - by Bella

I looked at them again. At the stock exchange prices in the SZ, the German newspaper “Süddeutsche Zeitung”. Always funny. For a long time now. Again and again. Have a look.


Source: SZ from 2014–05–15. Click to enlarge: MDax and TecDax

Aurubis is up 3.43. And Leoni 4.02. A difference of 17 %. But the bar for Leoni is 58 % longer.

It gets even more funny. Freenet is down 5.35. Leoni is 25 % shorter. But the bar for it 12 % longer. So much fun.

The fun comes from chopping. And stick-ash-to-it. Sometimes at 4. Sometimes at 11.

Sparkasse knows how to do it better.

Bubbly

Friday, May 30th, 2014 - by Bella

There is a new magazine. For economy and stuff. BILANZ (in German only). In it, there was this bubbling water spout. Have a look.

Profitability of the various business segments of Thyssen-Krupp. Source: Bilanz, May 2014, page 14.
Profitability of the various business segments of Thyssen-Krupp.
Source: The magazine “Bilanz”, May 2014, page 14.

Looked closer. With pleasure. Because eyes love it colorful. Though I didn’t like reading it. Have a look. Back and forth. Between numbers and numbers, colors and legend, numbers and headline, headline and headline. Stressful.


Source: me, with paw scan for my personal eye tracking.

Maybe economy is stressful, if it must be funny? And would be funnier, if it weren’t that stressful?

Classy, Sparkasse*!

Thursday, May 15th, 2014 - by Bella

He had to get money. For my food. Waiting outside I looked in the display window. There were houses and apartments for sale. And the stock market. Have a look.

DAX performance index, seen at the Sparkasse Nuremberg, Äußere Sulzbacher Straße.
Seen at the Sparkasse Nuremberg, Äußere Sulzbacher Straße.

Sparkasse uses graphical tables. Really classy!

* Sparkasse is a major German savings bank.

Headache

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014 - by Bella

You mustn’t chop the feet of columns. And you mustn’t hit them on the head either. Have a look.

Proportions of Youngsters with Accidents During Their First Year of Driving. Source: Hans Zeisel, Say it with figures, New York, 1985, page 128.
Source: Hans Zeisel, Say it with figures, New York, 1985, page 128.

This should have been fill columns. But now, it’s only funny. Hans drew it. His book is great. His graphics aren’t. Basically, I’m supposed to understand 5 percent and 8 percent. Instead, I was thinking about the squashed head.

Little difference too little

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014 - by Bella

Symbols are difficult. Some symbols can only be understood when they are next to each other. Have a look.


Source: my photos. Orangerie, Paris.

I thought I was right. Because it’s for girls here. I wasn’t right.

Apparently, I wasn’t the only one who was wrong. Have a look again.

Caesarians’ new chart

Sunday, March 30th, 2014 - by Bella

Today, there are more Caesarians than years ago. A whole lot more. Says the German newspaper “SZ”. Because senior college graduates don’t want to suffer. Because parents think that a birthday on 2012–12–12 is funny. Because of other things, too. That is bad, says “SZ”. Because the brain isn’t fully developed. Have a look.


Source: The German newspaper “Süddeutsche Zeitung”, 2014–03–17, page 16 (online). I put it together.

The bigger the red circle, the less births. In other words: bad, because less children are born on these days. The bigger the blue circle, the more births. In other words: bad, because more children are born on these days as nature wants.

Small circle for less, big circle for more – that would have been easier for me to understand.

Piggyback jumping

Saturday, March 15th, 2014 - by Bella

Last time but two: Crushed bars and jumping columns. Next to last time: decrushed bars. This time: columns that don’t jump anymore. Data from 2004 until 2013: Money for software companies, that are just starting their business. From companies with money.

Time rows, scaled logarithmically.
Redesign: me. Data from jumping columns, last time but two, scaled logarithmically.

The Angels don’t give that much money. But increasingly more. 2013 ten times more than 2004. The other two give sometimes more and sometimes less. You can look at it for a long time. And think about it.

Here is how “The Economist” draws it:

Hard sell: Capital invested in startup IT companies. Source: The Economist, Special Report „Tech Startups“, 2014-01-18, page 5.
Source: Next to last time. “The Economist”, Special Report „Tech Startups“, 2014–01–18, page 5.

Again, you can look at it for a long time. And think about it. But it won’t do any good. Because of the jumping columns. If the yellow columns jump, the brown columns jump as well. Whether they really jump or not. Though you can’t see, whether they really jump.

Dumb-chart

Friday, February 28th, 2014 - by Bella

Found this, the other day. In “Die Welt”. A national, daily German newspaper. It’s scaring its readers. With a dumb chart or, as they call it, “Chart of doom”. For stocks. Like in 1929.

A memorable parallel: Similarities before the great crash in 1929 and today are striking. Dow Jones in Points. Source: welt.de, 2014-02-18.
A memorable parallel: Similarities before the great crash in 1929 and today are striking. Dow Jones in points. Source: welt.de, 2014–02–18.

“Die Welt” says there are similarities. Because it uses the wrong scale. But look at the axes. Left: 200 to 350 (+ 75 percent). Right: 13,000 to 16,000 (+23 percent). That’s mean. Or dumb. Or both.

This is how it looks with the right scale:

Vergleichbar skalierte Zeitreihen in DeltaMaster.
Source: DeltaMaster, comparable scaling (in German).

The chart below works, too. Both time series on top of each other. Both start with 100. That’s good, too. But you can’t see the values anymore.

Normierte Zeitreihen in DeltaMaster.
Source: DeltaMaster, index time series.

Rethink the shrink-stretch

Saturday, February 15th, 2014 - by Bella

I said: I draw that again. Now have a look.


Redesign: me.

Look how it works. In “The Economist” it looked like that:

Startup your engines: Total follow-on funding for alumni from top accelerators. Source: The Economist, Special Report „Tech Startups“, 2014-01-18, page 5.
Source: Same as last time. “The Economist”, Special Report “Tech Startups”, 2014–01–18, page 5.

I promised: I’ll give it a try with point bars. And logarithmically. Now you can have a look again:


From me as well.

Have a look at the distances: They are the same between Y Combinator, Techstars and AngelPad. Because: Y Combinator is four times bigger than Techstars. And Techstars four times bigger than AngelPad. Great.

Funny, hm? 2 billion and 2 million within the same list. Point bars in a logarithmic way can deal with it.

Econo-mess

Thursday, January 30th, 2014 - by Bella

One of my intentions for 2014: I’ll stay dog-matic. Because… data are cruel. Have a look.

Startup your engines: Total follow-on funding for alumni from top accelerators. Source: The Economist, Special Report „Tech Startups“, 2014-01-18, page 5.
Source: “The Economist”, Special Report “Tech Startups”, 2014–01–18, page 5.

Two values were too big. The bars too long. The page too small. Snip! Snap! The two crushed bars add up to 2 billion. The other eight up to 300 million. Isn’t it bold how the Economist shrinks Y Combinator. And TechStars are shrunk-stretched: Too big for Y Combinator, too small for AngelPad.

Hard sell: Capital invested in startup IT companies. Quelle: The Economist, Special Report
Source: also there, page 3.

Two pages ahead: Jumping columns. Here, I would like to have snip snap. When the Early-stagers jump, the Later-stagers jump as well. Even if they are the epitome of calmness.

Could have been better shown in a dog-matic way: With point bars and lines. Both logarithmically. I’ll draw that again. And will show it to you. Look forward to it!

Worming

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014 - by Bella

Wolfhart gave me a book. As a present. From Eduard. About maps. I flipped through the pages. Then I got hungry. The dog food is sent by post. Produced in A. I live in D. In B and C, there are hungry dogs as well. Have a look. As if it were real. A real map. Between A and B the street is winding like a worm. Same between C and D.

Transportweg A-B-C-D topographisch dargestellt. Quelle: Eduard Imhof, Thematische Kartografie, Berlin u. a. 1972, Seite 192. Transportmengen auf den vereinfachten Strecken A-B und B-C und C-D. Quelle: Eduard Imhof, Thematische Kartografie, Berlin u. a. 1972, Seite 192.
Fig. 110 Transportation route A-B-C-D displayed topographically (left)
Fig. 111 Transport volume on the simplified route A-B and B-C and C-D (right)
Source: Eduard Imhof, Special subject cartography (in German: Thematische Kartografie), Berlin et. al. 1972, page 192.

How many parcels are left for me? Have a look at fig. 111. It’s still a pretty nice map. It still looks as if it were real. And you see the parcels.

Transportmengen von A nach B und von B nach C und von C nach D, Transportwege gestreckt. Quelle: Eduard Imhof, Thematische Kartografie, Berlin u. a. 1972, Seite 192. Quelle: Eduard Imhof, Thematische Kartografie, Berlin u. a. 1972, Seite 192.
Fig. 112 Transport volume from A to B and from B to C and from C to D. Transportation routes
are stretched (left)
Fig. 113 Transport volume from A to B, from A to C, from A to D, without specification of the
route (right)
Source: there again, page 193.

Have a look at fig. 112. Lots of map. Lots of statistic. It doesn’t look as if it were real anymore. And have a look at fig. 113. That’s for the post office. The want to know how much they can charge. From every hungry dog. Doesn’t look real at all. But it’s correct. For this purpose.

They are all correct. For their own purpose. See: not only the real things are correct.